bathsheba

Plum Tree Farm
Upgate Street
Carleton Rode
Norfolk NR16 1NJ

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FRUIT GROWING WITH MANUSCRIPT NOTES
FRUIT GROWING WITH MANUSCRIPT NOTES
FRUIT GROWING WITH MANUSCRIPT NOTES
FRUIT GROWING WITH MANUSCRIPT NOTES
FRUIT GROWING WITH MANUSCRIPT NOTES
FRUIT GROWING WITH MANUSCRIPT NOTES
FRUIT GROWING WITH MANUSCRIPT NOTES
A Treatise on the Culture and Management of Fruit Trees bound with a 19th Century manuscript diary and notes on fruit trees. August 1812 to September 1849.
printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, Paternoster Row; and T.Cadell and W.Davies, Strand1812
A Treatise on the Culture and Management of Fruit Trees bound with a 19th Century manuscript diary and notes on fruit trees. August 1812 to September 1849. FORSYTH, William. A Treatise on the Culture and Management of Fruit Trees in which a new method of pruning and training is fully described : to which is added, a new and improved edition of "Observations on the diseases, defects, and injuries, in all kind of fruit and forest trees" : with an account of a particular method of cure, published by order of government . By William Forsyth, F.A.S. and F.S.A. gardener to His Majesty at Kensington and St. James's, member of the Oeconomical Society at St. Petersburg, &c. &c. The Fourth edition, London, printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme, Paternoster Row; and T.Cadell and W.Davies, Strand, 1806. Bound in full calf, rebacked, spine in six compartments with blind stamping, original label reused. New corners, inner hinges reinforced, new front and rear free endpapers.Pp [xxviii],523. 13 plates, 11 of them folding , some foxing and offsetting, but a Very Good plus copy.[Bound in with] pp 54 manuscript notes on fruit growing dated from August 1812 to September 1849. This is a very good example of the fourth edition Forsyth’s classic work. It has had nearly 200 blank pages bound in at the rear of which over 54 have been used to keep notes, largely on the growing of Fruit Trees. The notes begin with an entry for August 1812 with the last being on September 1849. The notes are anonymous but we have found an embossing stamp to the last few leaves of the remaining blanks reading “W.Robinson/ Liverpool”. We have found several references to Robinson family members in Liverpool in connection with fruit growing; “….but very admirable fruit, a little injured by packing was also sent by Mr Robinson, gr.[gardener?] to A,Sinclair Esq of Liverpool….” [Gardeners Chronicle July 20 1844].Another similar entry relating to awards for fruit growing gives Mr Sinclair living at Hillside House. Further research led to; HILLSIDE HOUSE ESTATE - Wavertree The Capital Mansion called HILLSIDE HOUSE with stable & coach-house, greenhouses, gardens, orchards, pleasure grounds, lodge and land adjoining in a ring fence, situate in Wavertree on the north east side of Allerton Road, containing 10 acres of land statute measure now in the occupation of Archibald Sinclair Esq.[Liverpool Mercury 14 July 1854]. The Mansion was built a few years ago by the owner in a most substantial manner with the superintendance of the late Mr Samuel Rowland. It is pleasantly situated on an imminence, and views of Mossley Vale…...” Archibald Sinclair was a Bottle, plate, and Crown Glass Merchant who seems to have died in 1859. We have also uncovered yet further links to a William Robinson connected to fruit growing, with a Company founded by a William Robinson in 1860 with several subsequent generations of William Robinsons running the business, and which still survives today near Preston. The manuscript notes mention meetings with “Mr Farrer of Kirkdale” [ms. p7], “procuring an Orange Apricot from the Nursery of Messrs.Whalley”[ms. p 21], “Vines in the Hothouse at Euston….from the Nursery of Messrs. Chandlers …at Vauxhall London in pots “[ms. p 63], and he transcribes many entries in the Transactions of the Horticultural Society Liverpool Mercury 14 July 1854 by Mr A Briggs, Joseph Banks, J.A.Knight.etc. There are recipes for “Destroying Worms”, “Destroying Slugs”,” To Destroy Caterpillars” and “ To Destroy the American Bug in Apple Trees”. The author describes grafting Vines [ms. p 57], and writes dated entries describing interventions with fruit trees etc. Whilst authorship is as yet uncertain, this is an interesting manuscript, showing the concerns of an estate gardener in the early part of the C19th.
condition: Very Good
binding: Full leather, rebacked

£1200.00   



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