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THE ROARING GIRLE- MOLL CUT -PURSE
THE ROARING GIRLE- MOLL CUT -PURSE
THE ROARING GIRLE- MOLL CUT -PURSE
THE ROARING GIRLE- MOLL CUT -PURSE
THE ROARING GIRLE, OR MOLL CUT-PURSE As it hath lately Beene Acted on the Fortune-stage by the Prince and his Players.
Thomas Archer1780 /1810
MIDDLETON, T & DEKKAR, T. THE ROARING GIRLE, OR MOLL CUT-PURSE As it hath lately Beene Acted on the Fortune-stage by the Prince and his Players. Printed at London for Thomas Archer, and are to be sold at his Shop in Popes head- pallace, neere the Royal Exchange, 1611 Pp 132 [but, a later edition : BL has two copies dated to 1780 and 1810. This looks to us to date from the earlier period.] Frontis Page bearing a portrait of Moll bears the number VI, as does another play bound in this volume, and the final leaf states “the end of volume vi” suggesting that this volume is part of a larger work, possibly “ A select collection of old plays : in twelve volumes / a new ed., with additional notes and corrections, by the late Isaac Reed, Octavius Gilchrist, and the editor.” Dodsley, Robert 1703-1764. Published London : S. Prowett 1825-27. Three pages at the end of the play explaining the thieves cant words used .Bound with The Roaring Girle, / Moll Cut-Purse and with continuous pagination, are “The Widow’s Tears “, The White Devil”, “The Hog Hath Lost his Pearl”, and “The Four Prentices of London”. In later very competent full leather binding, spine in six compartments, Morocco title piece gilt. Blind ruling and corner fleurons to the boards. Title page is rather toned,there is some foxing and a worm track showing on four leaves. [Moll Cut Purse or Mary Frith (c. 1584 – 26 July 1659), alias Moll (or Mal) Cutpurse, was a notorious pickpocket and fence of the London underworld. The name Roaring Girl" is taken from the phrase "roaring boys"; young gentlemen who drank in taverns and then picked fights on the streets. Mary presented herself in public in male attire wearing doublet and breeches.She smoked a pipe and swore frequently. She is recorded as having been branded on her hand four times, a common punishment for thieves. Her first recorded crimes were in 1600 when she was arrested in Middlesex for stealing, and her larger than life character and bearing brought her to public gaze. In subsequent years, two plays were written about her: In 1610 John Day wrote the now lost play The Madde Pranckes of Mery Mall of the Bankside . Middleton and Dekker‘s, The Roaring Girle was first published the next year and emphasised her scandalous behaviour, especially that of her cross dressing in men's attire.]
condition: Very Good
binding: Full leather

£95.00   



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