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QUEEN CAROLINE OF BRUNSWICK BARRED FROM THE CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
QUEEN CAROLINE OF BRUNSWICK BARRED FROM THE CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
QUEEN CAROLINE OF BRUNSWICK BARRED FROM THE CORONATION OF GEORGE IV
1821
JOHN BULL, Sunday July 29 1821. Original newspaper with full coverage of Queen Caroline’s attempt to attend coronation of George IV of the previous Thursday which she was barred from attending. Pp 8, disbound, a little damage to the spine from sewing/ disbinding, but otherwise sound . Caroline of Brunswick (Caroline Amelia Elizabeth; 17 May 1768 – 7 August 1821). Queen of the United Kingdom by marriage to King George IV from 29 January 1820 until her death in 1821. Her father was Charles William Ferdinand of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel in Germany, and her mother, Augusta, was the sister of King George III. In 1794, she was engaged to the future George IV although the two of them had never met and despite the inconvenient fact of George already being illegally married to Maria Fitzherbert. George and Caroline married the following year, and nine months later Caroline gave birth to a daughter Charlotte. The King and Queen separated shortly afterwards. By 1806, rumours that Caroline had taken lovers and had an illegitimate child led to an investigation into her private life. The investigation found no hard evidence against her, but Caroline's access to her daughter was restricted. In 1814, she moved to Italy, where she employed Bartolomeo Pergami as a servant. Pergami soon became Caroline's closest companion, and it was widely assumed by her enemies that they were lovers. A number of scurrilous pamphlets were produced which lampooned the King and Queen, with woodcuts showing her semi naked in an embrace with Pergami. In 1817, Charlotte died in childbirth; Queen Caroline only heard the news in passing as the King would not communicate with her directly. He wanted a divorce, and set up another investigation to collect further evidence of her supposed adultery. In 1820, George became King. He hated his wife, vowed that she would never be crowned queen, and continued to try to divorce her. Caroline returned to Britain in order to assert her position .She was wildly popular with the British people who sympathised with her and who disliked the king for his immoral behaviour.She attracted vast crowds lining the route on her progress to London. In July 1821, Caroline was barred from the coronation of George IV, and this issue of John Bull carries a satirical and highly negative account of the day’s proceedings and the Queen’s role. There is a column and a half of close text in this High Tory, anti Queen Caroline newspaper pretending to describe the events . Caroline fell ill in London and died three weeks later; her funeral procession passed through London on its way to her native Brunswick where she was buried. By any account, one of the livelier and more…interesting…royals.
condition: Very Good

£25.00   



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